CICERO Systems™
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Be a Hero: Revolutionize Your Classroom!

Ditch the textbook – digitize your district and save millions of dollars in curriculum and textbook costs, while engaging your 21st century learners with CICERO: History Beyond the Textbook®.

CICERO is the featured classroom resource from CICERO Systems’ line of Common Core professional development products and services. CICERO is an award-winning digital resource consisting of lesson plans, primary sources, standards, rubrics, assessments, classroom activities, videos, games, interactive maps, and more.

Developed by university professors and technology specialists, CICERO is the quintessential teacher’s tool. CICERO covers U.S. History ranging from 600 B.C. to the present day, providing teachers with hundreds of lessons and activities at the middle and high school levels, all designed to enhance the teaching experience and improve student achievement. Developed from the American Institute for History Education’s highly acclaimed Liberty Fellowship® grant program, CICERO offers abundant educational resources, teaching methods and professional development tools; all laced in rich historical content designed to meet Common Core and state standards.

Common Core Teaching Strategies

Every unit within CICERO is laced with COMMON CORE methods and strategies.The Common Core State Standards provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them.

Watch the video to the right to learn more!

Teacher Common Core and TEKS Professional Development

CICERO Systems is a division of the American Institute for History Education. CICERO’s philosophy and methodology help revolutionize teaching substantive content not only by helping teachers become better teachers, but also by helping students learn history through engaging 21st technology, available online, anytime, virtually anywhere.CICERO Systems offers extensive Common Core and TEKS professional development programs designed to increase teacher’s content knowledge and significantly increase their students’ academic success. CICERO offers workshops, seminars, colloquia, summer institutes and discussions; live onsite, live online, or on-demand.

Common Core TEKS Classroom Resources Include:

  1. Over 30 Common Core teacher training videos and accompanying PowerPoints with ready-to-use classroom materials:
    • Close reading of informational text
    • Comparing informational texts
    • Contextualizing informational text
    • Developing historical thinking
  2. Classroom activities including dialogues, literature connections, graph readings, webquests, informational texts, hero biographies and more, all linked to Common Core and TEKS standards
  3. Over 70 videos:
    • Eyewitness accounts
    • Historic Newsreels
    • First-person portrayals
    • Documentaries and historic site tours
    • Professor/historian interviews
  4. Historical content and professional development by university historians for history and literature teachers
  5. Primary sources including landmark documents, speeches, letters and memorials
  6. Period-related audio clips, music and podcasts
  7. Images galleries of people, events, political cartoons and art
  8. Historical event maps
  9. Classroom PowerPoint presentations
  10. Interactive timelines
  11. Content-based readings and informational texts

CICERO is divided into 15 historical units for easy navigation:

The Roots of America | 600 B.C - 1776 A.D

Many of the ideas and values that Americans hold so dear were not invented by the Founding Fathers. The Roots of America stretch back more than 2,500 years. From Athenian Democracy through Enlightenment philosophy, this unit explores the many people and events that helped shape American government and culture.

  • The Roots of America

    600 BC – 1776 AD

    The Roots of America

    600 BC – 1776 AD

    Many of the ideas and values that Americans hold so dear were not invented by the Founding Fathers. The Roots of America stretch back more than 2,500 years. From Athenian Democracy through Enlightenment philosophy, this unit explores the many people and events that helped shape American government and culture.

  • The First Global Era

    500 AD – 1682 AD

    The First Global Era

    500 AD – 1682 AD

    Up until sixteenth century, and with very few exceptions, the vast majority of Europeans had never ventured beyond their own villages, towns, or cities. Less than three hundred years later, however, Europeans had established settlements in every corner of the globe. After more than a millennium, what sparked this relatively sudden global migration? This unit examines the motivations of early explorers and the impact of the First Global Era on people living on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean.

  • British North America

    1584 – 1763

    British North America

    1584 – 1763

    With competition between European nations at its height, countries such as France and England looked for their share of riches in North America. By 1733, thirteen British colonies had been established along the eastern coast. However, the centuries-old rivalry between Britain and France, combined with the American colonists’ desire to expand westward would soon ignite a world war. This unit traces the establishment and growth of British North America and examines the causes and consequences of the French and Indian War.

  • The Birth of Liberty

    1764 – 1788

    The Birth of Liberty

    1764 – 1788

    Britain emerged from the French and Indian War a world superpower, but that power came at a high price. To raise needed revenue, Parliament enacted a series of laws that would create an irreparable rift between Britain and her colonies, igniting the flames of war once again. When the smoke cleared, an independent United States emerged. However, it was only the start of the long struggle to forge a new and viable nation. This unit examines the American Revolution as well as a young nation’s bold attempt to create the world’s first successful republic.

  • The Early Republic

    1789 – 1823

    The Early Republic

    1789 – 1823

    Under the leadership of President George Washington, United States economic, foreign, and domestic policies all began to take shape and by 1800, American independence had proven durable. However, the United States would need to maintain that strong political and economic footing if it hoped to survive in the competitive world that was evolving. This unit offers a close examination of the first three and a half decades of the newly formed United States.

  • Jacksonians and the Whigs

    1824 – 1849

    Jacksonians and the Whigs

    1824 – 1849

    By the early 1820s, the nation stood at the dawn of a new era. This unit traces the political and cultural transformation that occurred in the United States during the first half of the nineteenth century. The topics examined include the rise of the modern two-party system, the development and escalation of sectional conflict, the emergence of reform movements, and the benefits and consequences of fulfilling America’s Manifest Destiny.

  • Antebellum America

    1850 – 1861

    Antebellum America

    1850 – 1861

    For nearly a century, America wrestled with two crucial issues: The extent of states’ rights and the existence of slavery in a land where, supposedly, “all men are created equal.” American leaders made compromises that temporarily calmed tempers, but did not resolve the underlying conflict. There came a time, however, when no compromise would suffice. This unit offers a close examination of the tumultuous decade leading up to the American Civil War.

  • Civil War and Reconstruction

    1861 – 1877

    Civil War and Reconstruction

    1861 – 1877

    Other American wars pale in comparison to the Civil War. No war, before or since, has cost as many American lives or inflicted as much destruction of American property. As this terrible chapter in American history drew to a close, disputes over slavery and secession had been settled. However, deep-seated notions regarding race, ethnicity, wealth, power, poverty, and privilege remained. This unit begins with a detailed examination of the events of the war. Then, the focus shifts to the triumphs, pitfalls, and failures of a nation struggling to heal.

  • Industry and Migration

    1869 – 1900

    Industry and Migration

    1869 – 1900

    In the final decades of the nineteenth century, the story of America was one of growth and migration. While industry attracted throngs of jobseekers to eastern cities, the promise of cheap land lured homesteaders farther west. This unit examines the people and events that made industrial growth and westward expansion possible while giving students the opportunity to weigh the pros and cons of each.

  • Global Power and World War I

    1895 – 1919

    Global Power and World War I

    1895 – 1919

    In the twentieth century, a variety of special interest groups emerged, each with their own reform agenda. At the same time, the nation was taking a more prominent role on the world stage. However, when international rivalries that had divided Europe for centuries reached the breaking point, the United States managed to remain neutral, in theory if not in fact, until 1917. This unit explores efforts to reform domestic policy, traces the evolution of foreign policy, and examines the events surrounding the “war to end all wars.”

  • Boom and Bust

    1920 - 1939

    Boom and Bust

    1920 - 1939

    A post-war economic boom generated record prosperity in the United States. Unfortunately, the prosperity and carefree spirit of the Roaring 20s held the seeds of an economic collapse. There had been depressions, or “panics” as they were called in the 1800s, throughout American history. However, the Great Depression was catastrophic. This unit contrasts the “boom” of the Roaring 20s with the “bust” of the 1930s.

  • World War II

    1935 – 1947

    World War II

    1935 – 1947

    When Britain and France declared war against Germany, the United States stood poised to supply them with weapons and other supplies, just as it had at the start of World War I. Once again, this “un-neutral” neutrality would lead the nation into war. This unit examines the causes, events, and consequences of the Second World War.

  • Cold War and Civil Rights

    1947 - 1976

    Cold War and Civil Rights

    1947 - 1976

    From the rubble of World War II, two Super Powers emerged: The United States and the Soviet Union. For the next fifty years, these two nations would vie for world dominance. At the same time, social unrest and racial violence inspired a new generation to stand up and demand that America live up to the ideals of equality and liberty espoused in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. This unit explores the international struggle for world dominance known as the Cold War, as well as the fight for Civil Rights in America.

  • A New Economy

    1977 - 2000

    A New Economy

    1977 - 2000

    In the final years of the 1970s, Americans struggled with crippling inflation and soaring unemployment. In 1981, President Reagan set into motion his four-point Program for Economic Recovery, resulting in one of the longest periods of economic expansion in U.S. history. This period also saw the end of the Cold War, astounding technological advancements, and increased global interdependence. This unit traces the development of our modern world and examines the attendant consequences, both positive and negative.

  • Facing a New Millennium

    2001 – the Present

    Facing a New Millennium

    2001 – the Present

    The worst terrorist attack on American soil in U.S. history, wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, climate change, a global financial crisis, widespread unemployment . . . these are just a few of the challenges America faced as it entered a new millennium. This unit highlights the trials, tragedies, and triumphs of the past two decades.

Common Core Teaching Strategies